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MS 441 - Ohio Association for Women in Education

The Ohio Association for Women in Education (OAWE) donated their archives to the Center for Archival Collections on May 21, 1985. OAWE records held at the Ohio State University Archives were transferred and added to the collection on October 4, 1985. The collection is comprised of board minutes, correspondence, committee and subject files, convention materials, and newsletters. No restrictions exist on the research use of the collection and copying is permitted for administrative and scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid written by Wendy Evans, archival intern, in 1995. The arrangement and finding aid was updated by W. Alex Smith, archival assistant, in 2006.

The Ohio Association for Women in Education began in 1923-1924, as the Ohio Association of Deans of Women. It was affiliated with the National Association of Deans of Women as a state association. The first president was Irma E. Voigt who served from 1924 to 1928. Conferences were held and membership slowly increased. By the 1940 convention, speakers such as Dean Grace Zorbaugh were saying, “We have won the right to cut our hair and show our legs and also to select our occupations…We must develop a will-to-power among young women.” Due to WWII, the 1943 convention was canceled. In November of 1948, the association celebrated its twenty-fifth year.

In 1956, the Ohio Association of Deans of Women changed its name to the Ohio Association of Women Deans, Administrators, and Counselors, reflective of changes with the profession nationally. The OAWDAC had three types of membership: active, associate, and honorary. Later, membership was changed to include active retired members and student members. In 1967, elementary school administrators and counselors were added to the OAWDAC.

OAWDAC became involved with several state committees which addressed women’s issues. The association was one of sixteen organizations to be charter members of the Ohio Commission on the Status of Women. OAWDAC was active in support of the Equal Rights Amendment and was consulted for the Domestic Violence Bill of 1985. The OAWDAC supported the Family Education Rights and Privacy Law in 1976. In 1991, again reflected of changes with the national association, OAWDAC changed its name to the Ohio Association for Women In Education. It dissolved when the national association dissolved in 2000.


MS 364 - Association of Fraternity Advisors

The Association of Fraternity Advisors donated their archives to the Center for Archival Collections in December of 1983, to be part of the National Student Affairs Archives. Additional donations of records occur periodically. The collection is comprised of board minutes, by-laws, former officer files, regional association reports, conference files, financial records, committee files, publications and photographs, dating largely from 1976 to the present. No restrictions exist on the research use of the collection and copying is permitted for administrative and scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid written by W. Alex Smith, archival assistant, in July 2006.

The Association of Fraternity Advisors was founded in 1976 as an organization which gave individuals concerned with the fraternity/sorority movement an avenue for professional growth and development. Growing quickly, AFA began developing the first of many position statements, one on alcohol and one on hazing, holding conferences and publishing a newsletter. Eventually AFA developed a code of ethics for professionals working with fraternities and sororities on college campuses.

Today, as it was at its inception, the AFA’s mission is to enhance its members’ ability to create fraternity and sorority experiences that positively affect students, host institutions and communities. This mission is undertaken by the AFA’s five regions. These five regions provide cooperation and professional stimulation to the fraternities and sororities of the US and Canada. (AFA Standard Operating Procedures Manual)

More information about the AFA can be found on their website at www.afa1976.org


MS 391 - Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA)

The National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA-Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education) collection was donated on October 24, 1983, as an important part of the National Student Affairs Archives. Many additions have been made to the collection since 1983. The collection consists of 155 linear feet of documents and encompasses the dates, 1919 to the present.

The collection is organized into eleven record groups, and a description of each group precedes the box/folder inventory. The record groups are: Administrative Files; Committees, Task Forces, Networks, and Knowledge Communities; Conference, Workshops, Seminars, and Institutes; Divisions, Centers, Academies and Programs; Executive Office; Foundation; Inter-association Activities; Officers and Appointees; Publications; Regions: and, Audio-Visuals.

NASPA-Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education was first organized in 1919 as the National Association of Deans and Advisors of Men. The beginning activities of this association revolved around annual conferences. By the 1930s, a formal constitution was approved. In 1951, the name of the organization changed to the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, broadening its membership base. Five commissions were established at the 1951 conference to deal with substantive, ongoing issues. These commissions also allowed more members to participate in the association’s work. Regions developed during the early 1960s, with elected Vice Presidents. These regions also allowed for more member participation in the development and successful completion of NASPA’s goals and objectives. Initiatives developed during the 1970s to allow more inclusion of women and minorities. A part-time controller was selected in 1970, and over time this position developed into a staffed executive office located in Washington, D.C. Divisions replaced the early commissions, centers and academies emerged along with workshops and institutes to cover the broad spectrum of issues facing student affairs administrators at college and university campuses across the nation and throughout the world. The Foundation was formally established in 1973, and now funds research and other initiatives deemed of importance to NASPA and the student affairs profession. For a detailed history, please see the NASPA website at: http://www.naspa.org


MS 319 - American College Personnel Association

The American College Personnel Association (ACPA-College Student Educators International) collection was donated in April 1983, as a key addition to the National Student Affairs Archives. Many additions have been made to the collection since 1983. The collection now consists of 135 linear feet of documents and encompasses the dates, 1932 to the present.

The collection is organized into thirteen record groups, and a description of each group precedes the box/folder inventory. The record groups are: Administrative Files; Commissions; Standing Committees; Committees, Task Forces, Core Councils; Conferences and Workshops; Executive Office; Foundation; Inter-Association Activities; Officer Files; Publications; State and International Divisions; Audio-Visuals; and, Ephemera.

The America College Personnel Association initially grew out of interest expressed by collegiate-level placement officers, then called appointment secretaries, at a meeting held in 1923 with the National Association of Women Deans under the auspices of the National Education Association. One year later in Chicago, the National Association of Appointment Secretaries was formed with nine members and May L. Cheney as president. During the next few years membership grew and in 1931, the organization changed its name to the American College Personnel Association, with two important organizational purposes: establishing sections within the national organization which would deal with different kinds of personnel work, and focusing on the promotion and development of people engaged in personnel responsibilities at the college level. Membership quickly grew and many of the early ACPA presidents were also leaders in the emerging field of “college personnel,” including, Esther Lloyd-Jones, E.G. Williamson, and C. Gilbert Wrenn.

ACPA was instrumental in working with other professional organizations to create the American Personnel and Guidance Association (APGA) , with ACPA becoming Division #1 on July 1, 1952. In 1983, ACPA was incorporated under the District of Columbia Non-Profit Act. In the spring of 1991, after forty years, ACPA leaders and members voted to disaffiliate from AACD (previously APGA), later renamed the American Counseling Association (ACA). This separation became effective on September 30, 1992. ACPA moved into new office space at the National Center for Higher Education at One Dupont Circle, NW, in Washington, D. C.

ACPA continues to be recognized for its leadership in addressing issues and trends in student affairs within the context of higher education. Its mission is to support and foster college student learning through the generation and dissemination of knowledge, which informs policies, practices, and programs for student affairs professionals and the higher education community. For a detailed history, please see the ACPA website at http://www2.myacpa.org.


MS 218 - National Association for Women in Education

The National Association for Women in Education (NAWE) collection contains over seventy cubic feet of material dating from 1903 to 2000. Proceedings, correspondence, financial documents, membership and committee files, audio-visual materials, and publications provide detailed resources for the institutional history of NAWE as well as the history of women in the field of higher education.

Represented are the files of each level of the Association’s organization structure. These structural levels include the Executive Board, officers and appointees, the Executive Office, state and regional affiliates, divisions, and committees and task forces. Also included are groups pertaining to special functions such as the Association’s trust fund/foundation, conventions, conferences, symposiums and workshops, literary works, publications, and NAWE’s relationship with other associations and public agencies.

The collection was obtained in January 1982, largely through the efforts of Jo Ann Fley, NAWE Archivist, Barbara Keller, NAWE Secretary, JoAnne Trow, NAWE President, and Patricia Rueckel, Executive Director. The NAWE collection forms a major part of the National Student Affairs Archives. Access to the collection is open to the public, and duplication is permitted for the purpose of conservation and research.

The National Association for Women in Education officially was established in 1916, with a membership of fifty women, following a series of meetings first initiated, in 1903, by Marion Talbot, Dean of Women at the University of Chicago, and Martha Foote Crow, Dean of Women at Northwestern University. This new professional association was named, National Association of Women Deans. Its mission included the following: “to make clear to the public and governing boards of educational institutions, where girls and women are educated, the necessity of having in each of these institutions a competent and thoroughly trained woman as dean of women, or of girls; to establish a high standard of qualifications and to secure adequate professional recognition for the position of dean of women; and to study the problems common to all deans of women and to disseminate information valuable in the solution of them.”

In 1956, the membership voted to recognize both its own expanding membership base and the expanding role of women educators and changed its name to the National Association of Women Deans and Counselors. During the same year, state and regional associations were formally affiliated with NAWDC. In 1973, the membership again voted to recognize the expanding role of women and changed its name to the National Association of Women Deans, Administrators and Counselors. Membership was open to men in 1976. A last name change occurred in 1991. This time the membership voted to simplify its name to the National Association for Women in Education reflecting its emphasis on holistic and life-long human development. Its mission changed to being “dedicated to providing professional support for women educators through programs, services, advocacy, and scholarly publications.”

NAWE’s role as an advocate for the quality of women, minorities, and the handicapped has been an integral part of the Association’s mission and work. Emphasis upon physical health programs and the educational guidance of youth dominated the first decades. During the 1950s attention turned toward civil rights. Since 1969, interest in the international and minority student has been addressed by the work of two distinct committees. Support of academic and vocational programs, facilities and financial assistance of the handicapped is evidenced by NAWE’s appointment to the President’s Commission on the Employment of the Handicapped in 1963. IN 1975, NAWE was one of the first organizations to pass a resolution of economic boycott against states which had not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment.

NAWE throughout its existence worked with other professional organizations to address such issues as vocational training, Greek life, alcohol and substance abuse, student freedoms and discipline, and professional standards. Despite efforts to increase membership and funds through foundation-related activities during the 1990s, the organization had to disband during the Summer of 2000.


MS 1079 - American College Health Association

The American College Health Association collection was donated to the Center for Archival Collections, to become part of the National Student Affairs Archives, in September 2007. The collection consists of proceedings, annual meeting files, committee files, correspondence, financial records, subject files, documents on the affiliates and sections, publications, and audio-visuals, dating from 1920 to the present. The collection is open to researchers, with one restriction. Researchers not affiliated with the ACHA must inform the ACHA Executive Director or designee about their research interests. Since its inception in 1920, the American College Health Association has been dedicated to the health needs of students at colleges and universities. It is the principal leadership organization for the field of college health and provides services, communications, and advocacy that help its members to advance the health of their campus communities (from the ACHA website). A more detailed history of ACHA can be found at: http://www.acha.org/ACHA/About/History/ACHA/About/History.aspx


MS 554 - National Association of College and University Residence Halls, Inc.

The National Association of College and University Residence Halls, Inc. collection was donated to the Center for Archival Collections in May 1988. The collection consists of twenty linear feet of minutes, correspondence, committee and subject files, conference files, publications, honorary records, and regional records, dating from 1958 to 2011.

The National Association of College and University Residence Halls, Inc. (NACURH, Inc.) was formed in 1954, at the Midwest Dormitory Conference held at Iowa State University. First named the Association of College and University Residence Halls (ACURH), by 1961, it took on its current name and created two regional organizations within the national. In 1971, it incorporated in the State of Oklahoma and officially became NACURH, Inc. By 1997, NACURH, Inc. included eight regions and had organized into a tax-exempt corporation, allowing for investment of contingency funds to increase long-term financial stability. NACURH, Inc. is considered to be the largest student run organization in the world. It brings together over 400 schools from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, and Qatar. It supports National Residence Hall Honorary chapters at member schools and holds an annual conference. All officers, both national and regional, are students and the positions are filled through a bid process. NACURH, Inc. promotes living on campus as an integral part of the college experience, and strives to provide resources to help member schools create excellent residence hall experiences for their students.
For more information about NACURH, Inc., please visit their website at: http://www.nacurh.org