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MS 1240 - Charles G. Eberly Collection, 1971-2010

The Charles G. Eberly Collection is comprised of approximately 9 linear feet of correspondence, promotion, course curricula/syllabi, research, and subject files from his lengthy career in higher education at Michigan State University and Eastern Illinois University. A prominent feature of the collection is Dr. Eberly’s research and professional activities within the field and their link to his commitment to students in not only the classroom, through testing/ evaluation and within the social realm of Greek issues prevalent on college campuses at the time of his employment. The majority of the documents date from approximately 1971 to his retirement in 2010. Earlier materials are included from his undergraduate and graduate studies. Dr. Eberly donated his papers to the Center for Archival Collections over a period of years with the last installment arriving in 2016. The papers are part of the holdings of the National Student Affairs Archives. The collection was processed and the finding aid written by Eric Honneffer in February 2018.


MS 739 - Council of Student Personnel Administrators

The Council of Student Personnel Administrators collection was donated in August 1997, with the assistance of Michael Wood. The collection includes founding documents, correspondence, meeting minutes from the organization and its committees, publications dating from the late 1960s through the early 1980s, meeting minutes, and individual organization files. The collection is open to researchers and duplication is permitted for research and conservation purposes.

Founded in 1958, COSPA reflects the desire at the time to form a federation of professional associations in student affairs and higher education. Some 14 national professional groups participated in COSPA during its heyday in the 1960s, addressing common concerns via commissions and task forces aimed at accreditation, professional development, school-college articulation, student issues, financial aid, ethics, placement, and legal questions. During the financial crunch of the 1970s, merger discussions between NASPA, ACPA, and NAWDAC led to NASPA’s withdrawal from COSPA and the collapse of COSPA. The Commission of Professional Development continued meeting until 1974 when their publications were absorbed by the ACPA.


MS 974 - Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education

The Council for the Advancement of Standards collection was donated in August 2002, with the assistance of Dr. Linda Clement. The collection includes meeting minutes, membership records, financial records, meeting files, correspondence, and publications, dating from 1979 to 2009. The collection is open to researchers and duplication is permitted for research and conservation purposes.

Founded in 1979, The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) is the pre-eminent force for promoting standards in student affairs, student services, and student development programs. CAS continues to create and deliver a dynamic and credible Book of Professional Standards and Guidelines and Self-Assessment Guides that are designed to lead to a host of quality-controlled programs and services. The ultimate purpose of CAS is to foster and enhance student learning, development, and achievement, and to promote good citizenship. CAS standards respond to real-time student needs, the requirements of sound pedagogy, and the effective management of more than 30 functional areas, consistent with institutional missions. Individuals and institutions from nearly 40 CAS member organizations comprise a constituency of over 100,000 professionals. Representing a significant majority of higher education practitioners in student programs and services throughout the country and beyond, no other body exists that so comprehensively speaks for this important field of endeavor. CAS will continue to have significant impact, especially as institutional effectiveness, student learning, outcomes assessment, accountability, and quality assurance become increasingly important to higher education.


MS 1108 - Alice Manicur Papers

In 1976-1977, Alice R. Manicur was selected as the first woman president to serve the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). She has also served in many NASPA capacities and chaired the San Francisco Conference in 1975. She was the first woman to hold a voting position on the NASPA Executive Committee. She was dean of students at Frostburg State College (Maryland) for many years and is the first – and only – person to hold that position. She has been active in other organizations and won SPATE’s award for meritorious service in 1972. In 1996, the NASPA Symposium for Women Aspiring to be Chief Student Affairs Officers was named for her.

1968-1999 Alice Manicur served as the first woman president of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. She was dean of students at Frostburg State University for many years. In 1996, the NASPA Symposium for Women Aspiring to be…


MS 1068 - Ohio Association for College Admission Counseling

1961 to the present Recognized as a state affiliate of the National Association for College Admission Counseling as early as 1946, this organization is comprised of professionals dedicated to assisting high school students in the transition from…


MS 1043 - American College Counseling Association

First established as a division of the American Association for Counseling and Development, the primary mission of the American College Counseling Association is to serve those in higher education whose professional identity is counseling and whose purpose is fostering student development. The ACCA collection includes four cubic feet of executive council minutes, constitutions and bylaws, handbooks, committee files, financial reports, conference files and publications, dating from 1991 to the present.


MS 974 - Council for the Advancement of Standards-Student Services/Development Programs

1979 to the present Organized in 1979-1980, the Council's records include six cubic feet of organizational documents, minutes, correspondence, self-assessment guides, professional standards publications and studies, and member files. This…


MS 552 - National Association for College Admission Counseling

1950 to the present This association's collection comprises 90 cubic feet of assembly and executive board proceedings, extensive publications including journals and newsletters, state and regional association files, conference files, committee…


MS 548 - National Orientation Directors Association

1975-1988 This association's collection comprises one cubic foot of board of directors minutes, handbooks, and publications.


MS 487 - Association of College and University Housing Officers

1949 to the present Formed in 1949, this association's collection comprises 15 cubic feet of minutes, conference proceedings, newsletters and journals, membership directories, committee files, and publications.


MS 426 - Ohio Counseling Association

1966 to the present Formerly the Ohio Personnel and Guidance Association, established in 1966, and then the Ohio Association for Counseling and Development, this association's collection includes five cubic feet of minutes, officer reports and…


MS 414 - American Association for Employment in Education

1935-present Since 1934, AAEE has provided members with direct address to research publications and networking opportunities focused on educator preparation, recruitment, hiring and retention. The collection includes minutes, conference files,…


MS 403 - Association of Fraternal Leadership and Values

1966-present The AFLV was formed in 2008 when the boards and membership of the Mid-American Greek Council Association and the Western Region Greek Association voted to consolidate the two organizations. The AFLV began operation on July 1, 2009. …


MS 1022 - Michigan College Personnel Association

The Michigan College Personnel Association donated their archives to the Center for Archival Collections to be part of the National Student Affairs Archives on March 23, 2005. The six cubic feet of constitutions, minutes, correspondence, conference files, committee files and publications date from the establishment of the Association in 1952-1953 and continue through 2006. No restrictions exist on the research use of the collection and duplication is permitted for scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid prepared by Ann Bowers, National Student Affairs Archivist, in May 2006.

The following history is taken from the MCPA website:

On July 31, 1952, thirteen individuals from eleven Michigan colleges and universities gathered at the University High School in Ann Arbor to formally establish the Michigan College Counselors Association (MCCA). In December, the first conference was held at Michigan State University. The first MCCA newsletter was published in 1954.

Although the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) was not chartering state divisions in the 1950's, the MCCA continued to strengthen its ties with the national organization. In October 1957, MCCA officially changed its name to the Michigan College Personnel Association (MCPA) and adopted its first constitution. The first MCPA journal was published in the spring of 1964.

In the 1960's, MCPA was caught in the middle of the affiliation struggles between ACPA and the American Personnel and Guidance Association (APGA). At the time, APGA was the parent association of ACPA. Reluctant to become affiliated with APGA or its state chapter, the Michigan Personnel and Guidance Association, MCPA remained as a state division without official recognition until March 27, 1972.

Part of this recognition meant that members of MCPA were also required to be members of MPGA, and during some years, APGA. In 1983, MCPA changed its constitution to allow individuals to become members of MCPA without having to also become members of MPGA. In September of 1992, after forty years of discussion about the affiliation with APGA (renamed in the interim period the American Association for Counseling and Development), ACPA officially disaffiliated from its parent association. The following July, MCPA completed its disaffiliation with both AACD and MACD.

In October 2002, MCPA celebrated its 50th anniversary at the annual conference in Grand Rapids. The theme of the conference was Memories of the Past...Reflections of the Future. The organization took this theme to heart and began to plan the future of the organization. MCPA became incorporated in August 2003 and received their 501 (c) 3 status with IRS in August 2004. These actions moved MCPA into the position to more efficiently and effectively function as professional organization.

From an organization of thirteen professionals, MCPA grew to 86 members in three years and nearly tripled in size ten years later. Currently, MCPA maintains a membership of approximately 275 professionals representing nearly every area within student affairs as well as every institution of higher education in the state. MCPA has not only grown in size, but has grown in its offerings to its members. The organization has moved from one conference and a journal to an annual conference, three one-day professional development events, a Website, a listserve, a journal, and three newsletters a year.

The Michigan College Personnel Association is one of the largest state divisions with ACPA, consisting of dedicated professionals who regularly contribute to the field at the state, regional and national levels.


MS 989 - Gamma Sigma Alpha, National Greek Academic Honor Society

Gamma Sigma Alpha was founded to promote intellectual interaction between Greek students and the academic community. The purpose of the Society is to promote the advancement of education among Greeks; to instill a greater spirit of cooperation among Greek students and organizations; and, to encourage excellence in scholarship. The Gamma Sigma Alpha National Greek Academic Honor Society was formed at the University of Southern California in 1989. The national board was established the following year and the Society quickly grew to over 150 chapters in its first eleven years. During the past few years, it has added regional awards, graduate scholarships and the funding of graduate research to its many programs and services. Membership requirements are based on grade point average and active membership in a Greek fraternity or sorority recognized by the host University.

For more information on Gamma Sigma Alpha, please refer to their web site at: www.gammasigmaalpha.org.

The collection housed at the Center for Archival Collections includes administrative and subject files, printed materials and banners and posters. Also included are dissertations representing the Research Initiative established between Gamma Sigma Alpha and the Higher Education Administration Program at Bowling Green State University to study achievement in fraternity and sororities. The dissertations are available for research use but fall under usual copyright restrictions. The collection was donated in August 2003, with additional documents transferred on an annual basis.


MS 973 - University Student Affairs National Vice Presidents' Group

The University Student Affairs National Vice Presidents' Group donated their archives to the Center for Archival Collections on July 30, 2002 to be part of the National Student Affairs Archives. Additional donations of records occur annually, dating from its establishment in 1967 to the present. The collection is comprised of correspondence, reports, resumes, conference files, and newsletters. Restrictions exist for use of the newsletters. Permission must be granted by the author of the article prior to quoting or using the article publicly. The collection was arranged and finding aid written by W. Alex Smith, archival assistant, in July 2006.

The history of the National Vice Presidents' Group dates back to the first meeting in June 1967 when a small group of student administrators met on the Pennsylvania State University campus. There were 15 charter members. Not all attending the Penn State meeting were Vice Presidents for Student Affairs. In attendance as well were Dr. Miriam Sheldon, who was at the time the Dean of Women at the University of Illinois and Dr. Thomas Magoon, who was the Director of the Counseling Center at the University of Maryland.

The Group's purpose for meeting came about because several of them were new to their professional positions as Vice Presidents. William Butler had assumed the newly created position of Vice President for Student Affairs at the University of Miami in 1965. Dr. Charles Lewis had been appointed the new Vice President at Penn State in 1964. Dr. Bob Ross was the new Executive Dean for Student Affairs at the University of Nebraska. Dr. Bob Callis was the new Vice President at the University of Missouri. All of them were close friends and were very active in the American College Personnel Association (ACPA). Eventually, all of them became Presidents of ACPA. As they met informally from time to time, they often would discuss the common issues on their campuses. They all felt the need to focus their attention on appropriate administrative tables of organization and how one should go about administering a newly created Division of Student Affairs in large public and private research universities. They agreed to hold a meeting in 1967 to discuss these, as well as other topics affecting students. Dr. Lewis agreed to host the first meeting of the Group on the Penn State campus, June 20-22, 1967.

The Vice Presidents' Group is a self-perpetuating one with current Vice Presidents' deciding upon the Group's future membership. Individuals of a proven "track record" in higher education are invited to membership, and the proposed member's institutional reputation as a major research university is also considered by the members. Over the years, there has been a good balance of VP representation from both the large public and private research universities. The Group's membership grew from 15 members to 20, and then to 25. The Group had remained small enough so that it can engage in meaningful conversations and discussions, with each VP in attendance being given an opportunity to discuss openly a topic or campus issue, which may be considered troublesome or timely to that person.

Initially, the Groups' membership was dominated by past and future presidents of APCA. Then, as time went by, the Group became more influenced by past and future leaders of NASPA. But, by and large, these national affiliations were put aside, even when it came to the selections of future members. Once a member stepped down from his/her current position as Vice President, that person would automatically retire from the Vice Presidents' Group. If a person moved from administration to the faculty ranks, retired, or died, that person and his or her university would lose membership in the group.

The Group meets twice a year and has done so since its founding. Only on one occasion did it meet three times and that was in 1970 when a special meeting was called after the students were killed at Kent State. Starting in 1967, the Group published a newsletter as another means of communicating with members. The Group has proved invaluable to its members through the meetings, conference calls, networking and the friendships developed.

(History courtesy of William R. Butler)


MS 795 - Robert Brown Papers

The Robert D. Brown Papers were donated in September of 1999 to be a part of the National Student Affairs Archives.  The collection is comprised of dissertations, articles, book chapters, and speeches.  The collection was arranged and finding aid written by W. Alex Smith, archival assistant, in August 2006.  The finding aid was updated upon Dr. Brown’s death in 2015 by Beth Hoag, doctoral graduate assistant.

Dr. Brown was the Carl A. Happold Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Senior Associate with Aspen Professional Development Associates.  He earned a B.A. is from St. John’s University, Minnesota (1955), and his M.A. (1956) and Ph.D. (1966) in counseling psychology from the University of Iowa.  He served in administrative positions, including: Director of Counseling, Director of Student Affairs Research, Assistant Vice President for the University of Nebraska, and Assistant Dean of Teachers College. 

Dr. Brown received numerous teaching awards, including a University-Wide Burlington Northern Distinguished Teacher Scholar Award and two University of Nebraska-Lincoln Distinguished Teaching Awards.  The American College Personnel Association presented him with a Distinguished Scholar Award.  In 1993, he received the Academic Excellence as a Graduate Faculty Member Award from the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

He served as president of the American College Personnel Association (1989-1990) and editor of the Journal of College Student Development (1983-1988). He was awarded the ACPA Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He was also president of the Nebraska Psychological Association and the Nebraska Student Personnel Association.  He authored or co-authored seven books, including three evaluation books, as well as numerous articles and book chapters.  He frequently served as an evaluation consultant to school systems, health agencies, hospitals, colleges and universities, educational television, and state and federally funded projects.  He made numerous presentations and keynote speeches around the US and internationally.  Dr. Brown passed away on December 7, 2014 in Lincoln, Nebraska.

(Information courtesy of Dr. Brown’s Vita Summary)


MS 779 - Burns B. Crookston Papers

Burns Ballantyne Crookston (1922-1975) was raised in Logan, Utah, and attended Utah State University, where he was an outstanding athlete as quarterback for the football team and an Intermountain Decathalon Champion. He continued his education earning a master’s degree in counseling and a doctorate in psychology and higher education from Teachers’ College, Columbia University. He was appointed Dean of Men at the University of Utah in 1954. From 1962 to 1971, he was employed at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, where he served in various positions from Associate Professor of Psychology and Professor of Education, to Dean of Students and Senior Associate for Planning and Development. In 1971, he joined the graduate faculty of the University of Connecticut as Professor of Higher Education with research interests in the area of the changing role of the Dean of Students. He contributed more than fifty articles to professional journals and books on topics ranging from academic advising, to drug abuse, campus unrest, and the use of third party intervention in conflict situations.

The Crookston Memorial Resource Collection was established by NASPA Region I and the University of Connecticut in 1977, to commemorate the Crookston spirit of lively debate, mutual challenge, and mutual support among professionals and students in higher education administration and student development education. Dr. Jane Fried, a former student of Crookston, served as collection coordinator and was instrumental in having the collection donated to the National Student Affairs Archives at Bowling Green State University. The collection is comprised of many of Crookston’s writings and publications as well as writings from other professionals in the field of higher education and student affairs.


MS 773 - Melvene Draheim Hardee Papers

The Melvene Draheim Hardee Papers were donated over a period of several months in 1993, by Dr. Hardee. The collection consists of correspondence, both personal and professional; publications, unpublished writing, subject and research files written or compiled by Dr. Hardee; and, news articles about her and honors received. The papers date from 1931 to 1994. No restrictions exist on the use of these papers and duplication is permitted for research purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid prepared by Ann Bowers, National Student Affairs Archivist, in December 2005.

Melvene Draheim Hardee was raised in Clarion, Iowa and received her undergraduate degree from Iowa State Teachers College. She then continued her education, receiving a masters degree from Columbia University and a doctorate from the University of Chicago. She was an instructor and head of the Communications Laboratory at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri until she was hired in 1948 by Florida State University as the first coordinator of counseling. Also in 1948, she married Thomas Hardee, meeting him earlier in the summer while a visiting professor at the University of Mississippi.

In 1959, she was one of the founding members of the Department of Higher Education at Florida State University and she continued to teach in this department until her retirement in 1989. In 1977, while still teaching at Florida State University she also was appointed as the first director of the Center for Studies of Women in Educational Management Systems. This Center was renamed the Melvene Draheim Hardee Center for Women in Higher Education in 1992, honoring her leadership and support. In 1980, she was appointed as the first director of the Institute for Studies in Higher Education at FSU.

Most important to Dr. Hardee was the mentoring of graduate students. She served as a major advisor and dissertation director for 120 doctoral students and supervised the work of more than 100 master students. Several of her students received national and regional awards for their dissertations

She authored several books and many articles in the areas of academic advising, history of higher education, the American college student, international students and women administrators. She also was very active in professional associations, serving as President of the American College Personnel Association (ACPA), president of the Southern College Personnel Association and active on the regional and national levels in the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). In 1964, she was presented with the ACPA Award for Distinguished Service. In 1979, she was the recipient of NASPA’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to American Higher Education and in 1988, she received the Robert H. Shaffer Award for Academic Excellence. NASPA’s Dissertation of the Year Award was named the Melvene D. Hardee Dissertation of the Year Award in 1986.

Although research, writing, teaching and professional involvement took most of her time, she still returned on weekends to the 877-acre farm purchased by her and her husband in Valdosta, Georgia. Although her husband died very unexpectedly in 1962, she continued to manage the farm. She increased it in size from the original 90-acre farm, planted over 450 acres in pine trees with the help of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, and created ponds and wildlife sanctuaries.

Dr. Hardee died in December 1994.


MS 702 - Susan R. Komives Papers

The Susan R. Komives Papers were donated to the National Student Affairs Archives, Center for Archival Collections, Bowling Green State University, by Dr. Komives, on November 26, 2012. The collection consists of twelve linear feet of publications, presentations, subject files, correspondence, awards, and audio-visual materials, dating from 1966-2013. The donation also included five linear feet of publications, journals, and reports which have been added to existing collections within the National Student Affairs Archives.

Dr. Susan Komives received her undergraduate and master’s degree from Florida State University. She completed her doctoral degree in Educational Administration and Supervision in 1973, from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and also was employed in the area of Residence Halls. She continued in her professional career serving as Associate Dean of Students at Denison University in Ohio, from 1973 to 1978; Vice President and Dean of Student Life at Stephens College in Missouri, from 1978 to 1985; and Vice President for Student Development at the University of Tampa, Florida, from 1985 to 1987. In 1987, Dr. Komives was hired as a faculty member in the Department of Counseling and Personnel Services at the University of Maryland, College Park. She retired in 2012, as Professor in the Counseling, Higher Education, and Special Education Department, and chair of the College Student Personnel Program.

Dr. Komives has held leadership positions in several professional associations, including President of the American College Personnel Association (1982-1983), President of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, (2008-2011), Member of the Board of Directors of the International Leadership Association (2009-2012), and Faculty Fellow for the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (2010-2013). She also served on many task forces and committees for these professional associations.

Dr. Komives’ contributions to the profession as a teacher, leader, speaker, and writer are too numerous to list in detail in this biographical sketch. Please refer to her curriculum vitae located in the biographical subject file, as well as the award nomination letters located in the awards subject files for a description of her publications, presentations, professional services, and the many students she mentored. Her impact on and within the profession has been felt deeply both on a national and international basis. As one nominee stated in her letter for the ACPA Lifetime Achievement Award, “Susan has an uncanny ability to generate passion and commitment in those around her. The number of leadership scholars that she has mentored is a testament to her influence. Her devotion to the field, and her wisdom and expertise, allow her to facilitate learning environments unlike any I have experienced in my prior twenty years of education.”


MS 685 - Wilma Minton Papers

The Wilma Minton Papers were donated to the Center for Archival Collections in May 1994. The one box collection consists of Wilma Minton's writings, records documenting her involvement with professional associations and subject files on various student issues. The papers date from 1962 to 1994. No restrictions exist on the use of these papers and duplication is permitted for research purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid prepared by W. Alex Smith, archives assistant, in June 2006.

Wilma Minton was born in Independence, Kansas. She received her Masters in Guidance and Counseling from Kansas State College of Pittsburg (now Pittsburg State University) in 1965. She was appointed the Assistant Dean of Women (a newly-created position) at Kansas State College that same year. The next year, a lecturer position opened in Psychology and Minton took that position and also served as a counselor in the Counseling Center. Three years later, she was appointed to the position of Dean of Women. She was in charge of all women's residence halls, women's organizations, women student discipline, the university student handbook and the study skills programs. In addition, she taught courses in Psychology and Women's History. Minton also became an active member of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, the Kansas Association of Student Personnel Administrators, as well as the Kansas Association of Women Deans and Counselors. In 1973, she was named Director of Student Services and placed in charge of Admissions, Financial Aid, Housing, the Student Union and Student Health. Later Career Placement and Counseling, International Programs and the Campus Police and Parking services were added to her list of responsibilities. Her career came to an end in the spring of 1994 as she retired from her final position as Vice President for Student Affairs after thirty years at Pittsburg State University. For more information on her career, please see her work, "Reflections On A Career In Student Affairs," located in the first folder of the collection.


MS 676 - U. S. Student Association

The United States Student Association (USSA) Collection was donated to the Center for Archival Collections in 1993, with a second addition acquired in 2005, to be part of the National Student Affairs Archives. The Collection is comprised of the papers of Dr. Dennis Trueblood who was on the National Advisory Board/Council during the formative years of the USSA. The Collection consists of meeting (Congress) files, chronological and subject files, and publications. The papers date from 1946 to 1966. These papers were donated with the assistance of Dr. Jack Graham, Professor Emeritus of Educational Administration and Higher Education at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. Dr. Trueblood headed the College Student Personnel Program at Southern Illinois and also served as president of the American College Personnel Association. No restrictions exist on the research use of this collection and duplication is permitted for administrative and scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid prepared by Ann Bowers, National Student Affairs Archivist, in October 2005.

The following history of the USSA is excerpted from A Brief History of NSA and USSA, written by Angus Johnston, USSA National Corporate Secretary, 1990-1992, and available on the USSA web site: http://www.usstudents.org.

In 1946 students from the United States and 37 other countries met in Prague to launch the International Union of Students. Upon their return, the American students called for a new national student organization. Hundreds of students attended a planning meeting in Chicago that December and a Constitution Convention was held the following year, officially establishing the United States National Student Association (NSA). In its first years of operation, it drafted a Student Bill of Rights and worked to strengthen student government and expand access to higher education.

From the beginning NSA members debated whether it should be a non-partisan organization or whether it had the responsibility to enter the political arena. Its original non-partisan stance was for all practical purposes eliminated when the NSA went on record in opposition to educational segregation. In 1951, NSA condemned "McCarthyism" but not McCarthy, and in 1953, it condemned South African apartheid but only in higher education. This "middling" road resulted in criticism from the conservatives which accused NSA of being a communist front and from the Communist Party for being too right-wing.

The 1950s also brought serious financial difficulties. These difficulties were eliminated when the CIA approached the leaders with a secret offer of large-scale funding which was accepted. For the next fifteen years, a small group of officers and staff worked closely with the CIA while others in NSA leadership positions were kept in the dark.

NSA officers and staff used their position to gather information on student leaders abroad for the agency and some alumni worked to ensure that NSA took "correct" positions on controversial questions. Most of the students were motivated by a sincere belief in the rightness of the government's cause. Self-interest also was a motivation as several received draft deferments and other help from the government.

By the late 1950s and 1960s, the NSA became involved in civil rights, opening up a civil rights office in Atlanta and developing ties with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. NSA also joined with the Students for a Democratic Society in antiwar protests. In 1967, a former staffer, Michael Wood, told a reporter from Ramparts magazine about the CIA connections. The Ramparts article exposed the CIA links with several organizations and brought the NSA almost to the point of dissolving. Instead it re-emerged as a radical group endorsing the Black power movement struggle and initiating a task force working to deny Lyndon Johnson re-nomination for President in 1968, instead replacing him with a candidate committed to ending the war in Vietman.

By 1974, NSA, criticized by other student organizations for not also advocating for higher education issues, created a separate foundation to carry out non-political work. This allowed the NSA and the National Student Lobby to merge in 1978 under the new name, United States Student Association. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the USSA located new funding sources, provided organized assistance to state student associations and in 1985, co-sponsored the first Grass Roots Organizing Weekend for campus leaders. The USSA advocated multicultural leadership when in 1989 the Congress mandated that people of color fill half the seats on the Board of Directors. In succeeding years, similar amendments ensured the representation for women, lesbians, gays and bisexuals on the Board.

USSA is the oldest and largest student group in the country and is reflective of what has occurred since WWII with the American student movement. Its current vision statement includes the following statements:

USSA believes education is a right and works on building grassroots power among students to win concrete victories that expand access to education at the federal, state and campus level.

The organization tracks and lobbies federal legislation and policy, and organizes students from across the country to participate in the political process, through testifying in official Congressional hearings, letter-writing campaigns, and face-to-face lobbying visits between students and their elected officials.

In addition, USSA trains and organizes students to win concrete victories on their campuses-like stopping fee hikes, expanding retention and recruitment programs for underrepresented students and improving campus safety.


MS 666 - Association for Student Conduct Administration

The Association for Student Conduct Administration donated their archives to the Center for Archival Collections in March 1993 to be part of the National Student Affairs Archives. Additional donations of records occur annually and the collection now stands at twenty cubic feet of material, dating from its establishment in 1987 to the present. The collection is comprised of board minutes and agenda items, officer correspondence, financial reports and budgets, membership handbooks, committee files, conference and institute planning files and programs, publications, photographs and videos. No restrictions exist on the research use of the collection and copying is permitted for administrative and scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid written by Ann Bowers, National Student Affairs Archivist, in October 2005.

In January 1987, Don Gehring organized a meeting of attendees at the Stetson University Law and Higher Education conference interested in establishing a professional organization to serve the needs of campus judicial officers. A steering committee was formed to develop a constitution and begin organizing such an association. By 1988, the first formal meeting was held, officers elected, and the name, Association for Student Judicial Affairs, approved. By 1989, the first annual conference was held in Clearwater Beach, Florida. Due to the growth of the organization, in 1991, the Board of Directors established a central office at Texas A&M University. In 1993, the first summer Campus Judicial Affairs Training Institute was held at Bowling Green State University and in 1994, it was named for Don Gehring. ASJA officially changed its name to the Association for Student Conduct Administration in 2009. The ASCA now includes a membership of over 1200 members in the United States and Canada and draws about 600 participants at its annual conferences.


MS 525 - Ohio College Personnel Association

The Ohio College Personnel Association donated their archives to the Center for Archival Collections on January 29, 1988, to be part of the National Student Affairs Archives. Additional donations of records occur annually and the collection now stands at ten cubic feet of material, dating from its establishment in 1975 to the present. The collection is comprised of board minutes and files, bylaws and policies, membership records, awards, committee files, conference programs and files, publications and photographs. No restrictions exist on the research use of the collection and copying is permitted for administrative and scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid written by Ann Bowers, National Student Affairs Archivist, in June 2005.

At the Spring 1975 meeting of the Ohio Student Personnel Association (OSPA), Bob Rodgers and Gerald Saddlemire presented the idea of organizing a chartered state association of the American College Personnel Association (ACPA). By March 1976, the first general meeting of the Ohio College Personnel Association (OCPA) was held and by April it received its charter from ACPA. The OCPA newsletter began publication in November 1976 and the first annual spring conference was held in March 1977 at Kenyon College. In the fall of 1979, OCPA offered its first New Professional Conference. By the mid-1980s, membership stood well over 500, and the Campus Liaison Program had grown to sixty-two campus liaisons appointed to serve as local representatives to college and universities, assisting in areas of membership recruitment and program development. In 1983, OCPA won its first ACPA Outstanding State Division Award.

By 1990, membership stood at 870 and OCPA continued to be the largest state division within ACPA. Also in 1990, the first (and only) issue of Connections , a journal for student affairs new professionals and graduate students was published by OCPA. In the spring of 1992, the first seminar for clerical, secretarial and administrative support staff for college and university Student Affairs offices was sponsored by OCPA and was considered highly successful. The Support Staff Conference continues to be held on an annual basis. In 1998-1999, OCPA began another journal, Ohio College Student Development Journal, and published two issues.

Several awards have been established by OCPA including the Phillip A. Tripp Distinguished Service Award, Mark Noffsinger New Professional Award, President's Service Award, Gerald L. Saddlemire Mentor Award, Graduate Student of the Year Award, Innovative Program Award, Undergraduate Student of the Year Award, Cultural Diversity Award, Robert A. Dubick Case Study Award, and Fayetta Paulsen Accomplished Leader Award. OCPA celebrated its 25th anniversary at the Fall Conference in 2001. Starting in 2003, OCPA with the Ohio Association of Student Personnel Administrators (OASPA) has offered a joint conference in January. OCPA continues to be one of the strongest of the ACPA state divisions, receiving over the years the Outstanding State Division award as well as awards for membership recruitment and retention.

For more information about OCPA, please refer to the file on its history located in the collection as well as its website: www.ocpaonline.org


MS 450 - Ohio Association of Student Personnel Administrators

The Ohio Association of Student Personnel Administrators donated their archives, with the help of Fayetta Paulsen, to the Center for Archival Collections in January 1986. The collection is comprised of constitutions, conference records, historical information, membership lists and financial records. A few minutes of board meetings and annual business meetings also are included. No restrictions exist on the research use of the collection and copying is permitted for administrative and scholarly purposes. The collection was arranged and finding aid written by Joanna B. Russ in October 1989, and updated by W. Alex Smith, archival assistant, in August 2006.

According to the OASPA constitution, the purpose of the association is to provide a forum to discuss and study the most effective methods of aiding students in their intellectual, social, moral and personal development and also to promote cooperation and communication among Ohio student affairs officers. OASPA is part of Region IV-E of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. Most of OASPA business historically has been conducted during an annual fall conference and also through the Advisory board meetings. OASPA confers annually the Gerald Saddlemire Award which is based on significant experience in the field of higher education and student affairs, demonstrated professional involvement at the state, regional and national levels, and commitment to the personal and educational success of both new professionals and students.